What It Is (posts below left; rate sheet, client list, other stuff below right)

My name is Bob Land. I am a full-time freelance editor, indexer, and proofreader. This blog is my website.

You'll find my rate sheet and client list here, as well as musings on the life of a freelancer; editing, proofreading, and indexing concerns and issues; my ongoing battles with books and production; and the occasional personal revelation.

Feel free to contact me directly with additional questions: landondemand@gmail.com.

Thanks for visiting. Leave me a comment. Come back often.

Friday, January 15, 2010

Taken Down a Notch

In the context of my Internet-based publishing gig, I come across scores of two-sentence bios for writers and editors. This one from an editor just caught my eye:

[So-and-so] attended college in northwestern Pennsylvania before moving to New York City to make a career in reference publishing. She worked as an indexer before being promoted to assistant editor.

I can only hope that the type of indexing she is talking about differs from the kind I do. I would hate to think that at this stage of my life, I'd be receiving a promotion to assistant editor. Then again, when it seems that every person I grew up with is a doctor, lawyer, high-powered B-man, professor, etc., maybe it's time to face the facts. What those facts are, I'd just as soon not ponder in too much detail right now.

2 comments:

moi said...

Moi has ten years experience in the publishing industry writing everything from advertising copy to history books. Recently, she was promoted to the position of waitress.

czar said...

Moi: My brother used to proofread with a guy in NYC who said he was an actor. My brother would ask, "Oh, what can I see you in?" That ended the conversation quickly. 'Fess up, buddy. You're a proofreader.

At this same gig, my brother proofread with a guy named George W., who had attended Harvard Business School with a somewhat more famous George W. My brother would say that his pal George W. could speak ("boast" is probably not the best word) of the furthest descent into proofreading.